A registered Charity No. 1058887

Back in the USSR The Russians will achieve their long held aim to take over a Top Secret British military base this October as part of a special exhibition at the RAF Air Defence Radar Museum.  The Hammer and Sickle red flag with fly over the former RAF Air Radar base along with music from the Red Army Choir.  But there is no need to worry as it is all part of an exhibition to coincide with the centenary of the October Revolution that brought the communists to power in Russia. The site at Neatishead near Horning, came into its own during the 50 years stand off between the West and the Communist East, known as the Cold War.  The special exhibition features a unique collection of Soviet Era socialist realist propaganda posters, a trademark of our one-time foes.  The exhibition also includes art from some contemporary Russian artists, who give their interpretation of Cold War themes.  After the Second World War, the RAF Radar station at Neatishead turned its attention to monitoring the skies for Soviet aircraft activity - the so-called 'Russian Bears’ that were probing our NATO allies’ airspace and our own.  Now that the Cold War is over, the exhibition attempts to look at some of the artwork from the Communist era with fresh eyes and admire the creativity and imagery in an historical context. The Soviet propaganda posters were the forerunners of many future propaganda posters, but their distinctive style, depicting noble workers and Soviet heroes, is instantly recognisable.   The posters, most from the 1970s and 1980s, feature workers and space-race themes including the Soviet cosmonaut and pilot, Yuri Alekseyevich Gagarin. Work by rising Russian art stars is also featured in the exhibition. There will be paintings by Gennadiy V. Ivanov, whose bold large-scale canvasses show, a mastery of paint.  Saint Petersburg based artist Vasili Kiselev, who produces the most touching animations with haunting themes that stay with you long after you watched them, is also featured, along with sculptures by conceptual artist Sophia Shuvalova. The exhibition is open Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays from October 3rd – 31st, 10.00am-5pm.  Admission charges apply for museum entrance, but the exhibition is free.  This is the first temporary exhibition to be held at the museum which is home to the radar and air defence story and is the largest museum in North Norfolk, with over 20 rooms and more than 10,000 exhibits both inside and out.
Back in the USSR The Russians will achieve their long held aim to take over a Top Secret British military base this October as part of a special exhibition at the RAF Air Defence Radar Museum.  The Hammer and Sickle red flag with fly over the former RAF Air Radar base along with music from the Red Army Choir.  But there is no need to worry as it is all part of an exhibition to coincide with the centenary of the October Revolution that brought the communists to power in Russia. The site at Neatishead near Horning, came into its own during the 50 years stand off between the West and the Communist East, known as the Cold War.  The special exhibition features a unique collection of Soviet Era socialist realist propaganda posters, a trademark of our one-time foes.  The exhibition also includes art from some contemporary Russian artists, who give their interpretation of Cold War themes.  After the Second World War, the RAF Radar station at Neatishead turned its attention to monitoring the skies for Soviet aircraft activity - the so-called 'Russian Bears’ that were probing our NATO allies’ airspace and our own.  Now that the Cold War is over, the exhibition attempts to look at some of the artwork from the Communist era with fresh eyes and admire the creativity and imagery in an historical context. The Soviet propaganda posters were the forerunners of many future propaganda posters, but their distinctive style, depicting noble workers and Soviet heroes, is instantly recognisable.   The posters, most from the 1970s and 1980s, feature workers and space-race themes including the Soviet cosmonaut and pilot, Yuri Alekseyevich Gagarin. Work by rising Russian art stars is also featured in the exhibition. There will be paintings by Gennadiy V. Ivanov, whose bold large-scale canvasses show, a mastery of paint.  Saint Petersburg based artist Vasili Kiselev, who produces the most touching animations with haunting themes that stay with you long after you watched them, is also featured, along with sculptures by conceptual artist Sophia Shuvalova. The exhibition is open Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays from October 3rd – 31st, 10.00am-5pm.  Admission charges apply for museum entrance, but the exhibition is free.  This is the first temporary exhibition to be held at the museum which is home to the radar and air defence story and is the largest museum in North Norfolk, with over 20 rooms and more than 10,000 exhibits both inside and out.

A registered Charity

 No. 1058887